Category Archives: Card Designs

Tips for New Card Makers

Eleven card designs using just one 12x12 sheet of pattern paper. Image (c) Stampin' Up!

Eleven card designs using just one 12×12 sheet of pattern paper. Image (c) Stampin’ Up!

For the first time in a long time, I really enjoyed card making this past weekend.  I took my time, relaxed, and am pleased with the results.  Over the course of two days, I made 22 cards – using just 2 sheets of 12×12 Stampin’ Up! Designer Series Paper, in addition to 6 sheets of Stampin’ Up! Whisper White 8-1/2 x 11 card stock and about 14 sheets of various other colors of Stampin’ Up! card stock (also 8-1/2 x 11).   Now that may seem like a lot of paper for 22 cards, but 11 of them are needed for the card bases, which means I used 7 sheets (plus the Designer Series Paper) for card covers, frames, etc.  More about that later.

There were several things that felt different about the weekend’s card making.  First, my goal wasn’t to make cards to sell or to give or send to family or friends.  Instead, I was making these cards to give to the residents of two local nursing homes.  I decided a few week ago that I needed another outlet for my cards – a charitable one.  So I contacted the activities departments of the nursing homes (having read online that nursing homes often accept handmade cards for their residents to use) and was very happy when my offers were met with great enthusiasm.  Second, I found a great sketch on Pinterest for the eleven card designs and was determined that for once I was going to stick to a sketch.  I was pleasantly surprised at how useful it was and at the results.  Third, I was patient and forgiving of myself – something that it’s often hard for this Aries girl to do.  But rather than Ram-like rushing through things, I took my time and enjoyed the process.

Along the way, I kept in mind my comments from my last post — about having accumulated too much stamping “stuff” too quickly.  Not only did slowing down allow me the time to think more about which tools and products – among all the ones that I have – did I want to use, it also gave me time to think about what I’d do differently if I were to start all over, and what advice I’d give to those just starting out in this great hobby.  Here are some of them:

Tip #1:  Set a budget and stick to it.   Do whatever works for you.  Let yourself spend $20 a week, each and every week.  Or put $10 in an envelope each week and then every month go spend your $40.  Whatever works, but figure out how much you are going to let yourself spend on this hobby and work within those means.  It took me a while to do that, but now I have it down to a science.   I keep a spreadsheet with my “wish list” on it.   Every couple of months when I put in a new Stampin’ Up! order, I know exactly how much I’m allowing myself to spend so I pull up my wish list (which is an ever-evolving document) and tweak my order to come within a dollar or two or my spending limit.

Tip #2: Be realistic about your budget.  Yes, this does somewhat contradict Tip #1, but if you want to be a card maker, there will be some initial start-up costs, and some on-going ones as well, that you need to be able to invest in.  For example, you’ll need a paper trimmer and a good pair of craft paper scissors to start out.  And don’t forget storage containers / systems of some sort.  Maybe you already own some things that can be repurposed, but you may need to buy some new ones.  Paper and other supplies will need to be stored somewhere.  In terms of on-going costs, your adhesives will probably be the items you most frequently need to replace.  I buy mine in bulk on-line; I’ve found that to be the most cost-effective option.  But it’s still an expense you need to take into consideration and allow funds for.

Tip #3: Speaking of adhesives….make sure your adhesive runner isn’t permanent the moment you stick it down — find one that is temporarily removable and then becomes permanent.   Nothing ruins a card quicker than putting something down crooked and not being able to quickly peel it back up again to readjust it.

Tip #4: Always keep a spare cutting blade for your paper trimmer.  Crisp cut lines vs. ragged, dull cut lines can really affect the quality of a finished card.

Tip #5 Watch out for the copyright mark on patterned paper.  There’s nothing like finishing your masterpiece only to realize that someone’s copyright is standing front and center.   Been there, done that.  Either cut off that edge of the paper, or strategically cover it.

Tip #6 Measure twice, cut once.  This is particularly true if you are working with patterned paper that has a design that goes in only one direction.  I can’t count the number of times I’ve been rushing and cut patterned paper for a horizontal card in the vertical direction – or vice versa – and then the dimensions are all wrong – and paper is wasted.  Well, not quite; I end up doing some sort of work around, but it never feels as nice as it would have if I’d just been paying more attention to begin with.

Tip #7 Don’t be afraid to admit you made a mistake.  It happens.  At least when I make cards it does.  I think I’ve come up with a GREAT idea, but then I step back, look at it and think, yeah, that’s just a little too loud, or too “out there” for anyone but me to like (or even me to like).  So I pull apart the pieces, salvage what I can of the card stock I used, and start over.

Tip #8 Find a Brand and Stick with it.  As I’ve mentioned elsewhere on my blog, I’m an independent demonstrator with Stampin’ Up!     I started card making with their products and have stuck with them because of the high quality – and the wonderful coordination of product lines and colors.  I’ve tried getting random paper stacks from the brick and mortar retailers, but find it difficult to use them because it’s so hard to match colors.  Sticking with just Stampin’ Up! paper means I can buy a package of their designer series paper and it will coordinate with five or six of their solid color card stocks that I already have.   This year they’ve started selling solid color card stock assortments to match the designer series paper.  It’s a great, economical way to stock up on the coordinating colors.

Tip #9 Copy and Share Everything (CASE).  CASE is a very familiar acronym in the paper-crafting world.  There are so many talented card makers and they share their gift with others through blogs, on Pinterest, and with videos demonstrating how they achieved that perfect design.  Set up your own Pinterest page and save those card designs you like and would like to copy either directly or use as inspiration for your own design.  But remember, it doesn’t take much to make a design your own — turn the design 90 degrees; add a frame of coordinating colored card stock around every piece of patterned paper (this simple technique really boosts the look of a card); when a sketch shows a solid line, remember it can be a ribbon, card stock, a row of buttons or punched flowers – anything you choose to represent a “line”, etc., etc.  So keep a separate Pinterest board just of sketches, here’s mine and stretch and challenge yourself often.

Tip #10 Don’t Save Every Scrap, But Organize the Ones You Do.  The tag line for Best Friends Animal Society, one of the country’s largest animal rescue organizations which runs an animal sanctuary in Kanab, Utah (I hope to visit someday), is “Save Them All”.  So true for homeless pets.  Not so true for paper scraps.  Too many and too small ones can be a burden if you feel you “have” to use them.  Then the scraps are forcing your design and it is not a good thing.  True, I’ve seen some beautiful cards that take advantage of scraps, but not all the 1×1 inch ones I seem to accumulate!  So be judicial and throw out anything that is really too small to do anything with.  And sort the other pieces in some logical manner so you’ll know you’ll be able to find them to use again.  I sort mine into plastic bags by color group.  So when I need to find a scrap of a particular shade of green, I go to the green bag.  I’ve seen other demonstrators who have more sophisticated storage systems do the same thing except with file folders by specific color name.

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I hope you’ve found these tips useful.  I’ll add more in another post as I think of them.  I’ve included below the sketch I used this past weekend and a few close ups of some of the cards I created.

 

Sketch for Making Eleven Cards from One 12 x 12 sheet of patterned paper

Sketch for Making Eleven Cards from One 12 x 12 sheet of patterned paper; from Sylvie Drauer Images (c) Stampin’ Up!

Cards by Certain Smiles Images (c) Stampin' Up!

Cards by Certain Smiles Images (c) Stampin’ Up!

Cards by Certain Smiles Images (c) Stampin' Up!

Cards by Certain Smiles Images (c) Stampin’ Up!

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Filed under Card Designs, Card Making, Card Sketches

Masculine Card Designs

Thank You Card created by Certain Smiles. Images c. Stampin' Up!

Thank You Card created by Certain Smiles. Images c. Stampin’ Up!

A card making group I belong to had a challenge this month — give away two of your cards at random.  Easy enough, right?  Well, maybe not.  I decided that one of the mine would go to a contractor I’ve worked with in the past.  He was coming over to give me an estimate for some additional work on my condo.  I thought it would be nice to make a couple thank you cards for him to have on hand for clients or coworkers.

But when I sat down to design the cards, I found myself a little stumped.  These were different than most cards I make.  There were for a guy to possibly give to another guy.  That seemed to eliminated probably 90% of my card stock, punches and stamps!  OK, maybe I exaggerate slightly, but it definitely made me rethink my usual “go to” designs.

According to the Greeting Card Association, women purchase 80% of all greeting cards, and spend more time selecting the ones they do purchase than men do.  So it wouldn’t surprise me if similar numbers (or more) of women than men make cards and so logically the designs on those products are naturally geared towards a female audience.  Butterflies, flowers and bright colors seem to dominate the design landscape.  No wonder men stay away.

So what makes a “man’s card” and how does one make one?  The card at the top of this page is what I ended up giving to my contractor.   It was pure coincidence that Mary Fish, a spectacular Stampin’ Up! demonstrator whose blog I follow daily, posted today about masculine cards.  One of her tips for these designs is to keep it simple, but don’t be afraid to add a splash of color – pretty much the path I took when I added the medium blue accent to set off the browns.

How else can you add that extra “something” when ribbons, buttons, and (gasp) glitter are off the table?  First, try bold, not bright colors.  Pastels, though pretty, aren’t going to cut it.  Go with strong colors — red, blue, orange.  Second, find boldly patterned papers to add some interest.  In its 2015 Occasions catalog, Stampin’ Up! recognized the “man niche” with its Adventure Bound Designer Series Paper stack.  These designs, with some plaids as well as some photographic images of bricks, trees, logs and stones, give a wide variety to let your imagination soar while still coordinating with several of Stampin’ Up!’s card stocks.

Homemade "Designer Series Paper" using Stampin' Up!'s Gorgeous Grunge Stamp Set

Homemade “Designer Series Paper” using Stampin’ Up!’s Gorgeous Grunge Stamp Set

Or, make your own patterned paper.  This “Designer Series Paper” made with Stampin’ Up!’s Gorgeous Grunge stamp set, and several Stampin’ Up! inks — Cherry Cobbler, Chocolate Chip, Sahara Sand, Not Quite Navy (retired), and Pumpkin Pie on a piece of Whisper White card stock. I just randomly stamped, starting with the thin parallel line stamp, followed by the thick slanted line stamp, and finishing with the random spots stamp in two different colors.

As noted, I used Gorgeous Grunge for my paper, but Stampin’ Up! sells many sets that can be used to make your own paper.  These include, but are not limited to:


Stampin’ Up! Hand Carved background stamp (available in wood and clear mount)

Stampin’ Up! Hardwood background stamp (available in wood and clear mount)


Stampin’ Up! Positively Chevron background stamp (available in wood and clear mount)


Stampin’ Up! Work of Art Stamp Set (available in wood and clear mount)


Stampin’ Up! Geometrical Stamp Set (available in wood and clear mount)

Stampin’ Up! Eye-Catching Ikat Photopolymer Stamp Set

Here are two of the cards that I created with my paper:

Birthday Card Created by Certain Smiles, Images c. Stampin' Up!

Birthday Card Created by Certain Smiles, Images c. Stampin’ Up!

Thank You Card Created by Certain Smiles. Images c. Stampin' Up!

Thank You Card Created by Certain Smiles. Images c. Stampin’ Up!

You’ll see I also used some textured embossing in the birthday card for some added interest as well.

So remember, when creating a card for a guy, a good rule of thumb is to keep it simple, but add a splash of color or a striking design element.  Just be sure to leave the glitter at home.

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Color Choices in Card Making

Lotus Blossom in Melon Mambo (image c. Stampin' Up!)

Lotus Blossom in Melon Mambo (Image c. Stampin’ Up!)

A couple of weeks ago, I spent the afternoon making cards (as I do most weekend afternoons). I was working with a colorful group of Stampin’ Up!’s designer series papers and their coordinating solid colored card stocks (mostly Melon Mambo) but was getting tired of making thank you, birthday, and thinking of you cards, more appropriate to the colors I was using. So my mind started to wander to the new Lotus Blossom stamp set I’d received during this year’s Sale-a-Bration promotion. I decided to try it out using Melon Mambo ink.   The results were spectacular, as you can see.

But the question now was, what type of card should I make to go along with it?   My answer? A sympathy card! The message inside reads “May you find comfort in God’s word and in the knowledge that others care and sympathize with you.”

Sympathy Card in Pinks with Lotus Blossom (images c. Stampin' Up!)

Sympathy Card in Pinks with Lotus Blossom (images c. Stampin’ Up!)

Apology Card in pinks (images c. Stampin' Up!)

Apology Card in pinks (images c. Stampin’ Up!)

I used the same patterned paper, stamp set and light pink card stock base to make a general “apology” card (there is no sentiment stamped on the inside so it can be used for any occasion where “I’m sorry” needs to be said).

As I think I’ve written here before, I love bright colors.  But as I step back now after a few weeks, I must admit I’ve begun to question that decision. Seriously.  Pink for a sympathy card?!?!?!  What was I thinking?

Obviously, I wasn’t.  While I can’t quite bring myself to dislike these cards (I just love the colors) I know in my heart that the colors clash with the sentiments they convey.  And as much as my head tries to rationalize it (even as I write this I continue to try to justify the color choices…..), I know I went a little too far with my creative license on these.

Just as per Ecclesiastes 3:1, To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven, to every occasion there are fitting card designs and less fitting ones.  Not that an occasional non-traditional look isn’t good.  It can be great in fact, but more me, at least, I think I’m going to stick with the traditional from here on out.  In fact I spent this morning working on sympathy cards that can be used at work.  They are all done in browns, ivories, greens, and rich purples.  They look much more appropriate, don’t you think?

OfficeSympathyCards_3

Sympathy Cards by Certain Smiles, images c. Stampin’ Up!

OfficeSympathyCards_1

Sympathy Cards by Certain Smiles, images c. Stampin’ Up!

Sympathy Cards by Certain Smiles, images c. Stampin' Up!

Sympathy Cards by Certain Smiles, images c. Stampin’ Up!

I could go on about the “psychology of color” (and there are plenty of websites out there on the subject), but I think, for now at least, I’ll just stick with my gut instincts….and avoid pink for sympathy cards in the future!!

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Filed under Card Designs, Colors, Sympathy Cards